François Boucher

French, Rococo, 1703-1770

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Young Woman with a
Bouquet of Roses

François Boucher
245 USD


Resting Maiden (Resting Girl)
François Boucher

264 USD

The Secret Message
François Boucher

310 USD

Jupiter in the Guise of Diana,
and the Nymph Callisto

François Boucher

337 USD
 
Diana Leaving the Bath
François Boucher

333 USD
 
The Toilet of Venus
François Boucher

343 USD
 
Portrait of Madame de Pompadour
François Boucher

435 USD
 
Landscape with a Water Mill
François Boucher

421 USD
 
Saint Peter Attempting to Walk
on Water

François Boucher

473 USD
 
The Odalisque, 1749
François Boucher

262 USD
 
The Afternoon Meal
François Boucher

429 USD
 
The Painter in his Studio
François Boucher

243 USD
 
The Beautiful Kitchen Maid
François Boucher

313 USD
 
Madame de Pompadour, 1758
François Boucher

264 USD
 
Mill at Charenton
François Boucher

414 USD
 
Hercules and Omphale
François Boucher

336 USD
 
Are They Thinking about
the Grape?

François Boucher

339 USD
 
Madame Bergeret
François Boucher

344 USD
 
Les Sabots
François Boucher

329 USD
 
Madame de Pompadour, 1750
François Boucher

348 USD
 
Diana after the Hunt
François Boucher

353 USD
 
Landscape near Beauvais
François Boucher

424 USD
 
Rinaldo and Armida
François Boucher

441 USD
 
An Autumn Pastoral
François Boucher

521 USD
 
Pan and Syrinx
François Boucher

271 USD
 
Les Confidences Pastorales
François Boucher

351 USD
 
The Bath of Venus
François Boucher

343 USD
 
The Interrupted Sleep
François Boucher

327 USD

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François Boucher ((29 September 1703 – 30 May 1770) was a French painter in the Rococo style. Boucher is known for his idyllic and voluptuous paintings on classical themes, decorative allegories, and pastoral scenes. He was perhaps the most celebrated painter and decorative artist of the 18th century. He also painted several portraits of his patroness, Madame de Pompadour. 

Life

A native of Paris, Boucher was the son of a minor painter Nicolas Boucher, who gave him his first artistic training. At the age of seventeen, a painting by Boucher was admired by the painter François Lemoyne. Lemoyne later appointed Boucher as his apprentice, but after only three months, he went to work for the engraver Jean-François Cars. In 1720, he won the elite Grand Prix de Rome for painting, but did not take up the consequential opportunity to study in Italy until five years later, due to financial problems at the Académie royale de peinture et de sculpture. On his return from studying in Italy he was admitted to the refounded Académie de peinture et de sculpture on 24 November 1731. His morceau de réception (reception piece) was his Rinaldo and Armida of 1734.

Boucher became a faculty member in 1734 and his career accelerated from this point as he was promoted Professor then Rector of the Academy, becoming inspector at the Royal Gobelins Manufactory and finally Premier Peintre du Roi (First Painter of the King) in 1765.

Boucher died on 30 May 1770 in his native Paris. His name, along with that of his patron Madame de Pompadour, had become synonymous with the French Rococo style, leading the Goncourt brothers to write: "Boucher is one of those men who represent the taste of a century, who express, personify and embody it."

Boucher is famous for saying that nature is "trop verte et mal éclairée" (too green and badly lit).

Boucher was associated with the gemstone engraver Jacques Guay, whom he taught to draw. Later Boucher made a series of drawings of works by Guay which Madame de Pompadour then engraved and distributed as a handsomely bound volume to favored courtiers.The neoclassical painter Jacques-Louis David began his painting instruction under Boucher.

Painting

Reflecting inspiration gained from such artists as Peter Paul Rubens and Antoine Watteau, Boucher's early works celebrate the idyllic and tranquil portrayal of nature and landscape with great elan. However, his art typically forgoes traditional rural innocence to portray scenes with a definitive style of eroticism as his mythological scenes are passionate and intimately amorous rather than traditionally epic. Marquise de Pompadour (mistress of King Louis XV), whose name became synonymous with Rococo art, was a great admirer of his work.

Boucher's paintings such as The Breakfast (1739), a familial scene, show how he was as a master of the genre scene, where he regularly used his own wife and children as models. These intimate family scenes are contrasting to the licentious style seen in his Odalisque portraits.

The dark-haired version of the Odalisque portraits prompted claims by the art critic Denis Diderot that Boucher was "prostituting his own wife", and the Blonde Odalisque was a portrait that illustrated the extramarital relationships of the King. Boucher gained lasting notoriety through such private commissions for wealthy collectors and, after Diderot expressed his disapproval, his reputation came under increasing critical attack during the last years of his career.

Source: Wikipedia