Tobias Stranover

Romanian, Baroque, 1684-1756

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Peacock, Hen and Cock Pheasant in a Landscape
Tobias Stranover
262 USD



Still Life of Fruit and Birds
Tobias Stranover
264 USD

A Great Curassow, Silver Pheasant
and other Birds in a Landscape

Tobias Stranover
261 USD

Various Types of Birds (with a Black Bird and a White Bird)
Tobias Stranover
259 USD

Various Types of Birds (with a Black Bird and a Parrot)
Tobias Stranover
257 USD
 
Various Types of Birds (with a Flamingo)
Tobias Stranover
264 USD
 
Various Types of Birds (with a Kingfisher and a Fountain)
Tobias Stranover
265 USD
 
Various Types of Birds (with a Parrot)
Tobias Stranover
256 USD
 
Various Types of Birds (with a Peacock)
Tobias Stranover
260 USD
 
Various Types of Birds (with a Toucan and a Pheasant)
Tobias Stranover
259 USD
 
Various Types of Birds (with a Viaduct)
Tobias Stranover
266 USD
 
Still Life with a Monkey,
Jay and Parrot

Tobias Stranover
258 USD
 
Macaw and Other Birds in a Landscape
Tobias Stranover
260 USD
 
Canary, Green Parrot and Other Birds in a Landscape
Tobias Stranover
260 USD
 
Still Life with a Basket of Fruit
and Flowers

Tobias Stranover
261 USD
 
The Mobbing of a Long-Eared Owl by Other Birds
Tobias Stranover
262 USD
 
The Still-Life with Flowers
Tobias Stranover
254 USD
 
 
 

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Stranover spent most of his career in England, after arriving there in circa 1703.  In London, he initially worked in the studio of his uncle, Jakob Bogdani, who specialized in fruitpieces and decorative assemblages of birds in landscapes.  As in Bogdani’s work, many of Stranover’s bird pieces are set in park landscapes with classical buildings and garden features. This painting, dated 1728, is unusual in showing a rural landscape with ploughed fields and a farmhouse.  In the distance is a church that seems like a medieval English parish church, framed in mountains which owe more to Stranover’s native Transylvania than his adopted country.
Stranover characteristically groups both exotic and native species, and large, showy birds with smaller ones, to create a lively gathering of avian colors, shapes and behavior.  The centerpiece of Stranover’s painting is a female Great Curassow (Crax rubra), a large bird of the turkey family found in the rainforests of Mexico and Central America. The aesthetic attraction is its black and white, curly crest and barred tail offset by a reddish body.  Equally dramatic are the male Silver Pheasant (Lophura nycthemera) and Golden Pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) to the left, both natives of China but brought to Europe for their spectacular plumage.  Tucked at the feet of the Curassow are two resident British species, the Red-legged Partridge (Alectoris graeca, originally from southern Europe) and Oystercatcher (Haematopus ostralegus), attacking its favorite food, shellfish. Behind the Curassow is a Common Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), introduced into Europe from Asia in the 11th century.  To the right is a Guinea Fowl, related to pheasants and originally from Africa, but long domesticated for its meat.  Behind is another Oystercatcher, an adult with the white "chinstrap" of winter plumage.   Across the top of the painting are a Pigeon in flight, a Chough (Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax) and a male Goldfinch (Carduelis carduelis).