Johannes Vermeer

Dutch, Baroque, 1632–1675

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Girl with a Pearl Earring
Johannes Vermeer
247 USD


The Girl with a Wineglass
Johannes Vermeer
310 USD

A Lady Writing a Letter
Johannes Vermeer
268 USD

A Maid Asleep
Johannes Vermeer
311 USD
 
Christ in the House of
Mary and Martha

Johannes Vermeer
332 USD
 
Diana and Her Companions
Johannes Vermeer
337 USD
 
Girl Interrupted at Her Music
Johannes Vermeer
314 USD
 
Girl Reading a Letter
at an Open Window

Johannes Vermeer
301 USD
 
Girl with a Flute
Johannes Vermeer
249 USD
 
Girl with a Red Hat
Johannes Vermeer
245 USD
 
Portrait of a Young Woman
Johannes Vermeer
250 USD
 
Lady Seated at a Virginal
Johannes Vermeer
334 USD
 
Lady Writing a Letter with Her Maid
Johannes Vermeer
304 USD
 
Mistress and Maid
Johannes Vermeer
268 USD
 
Officer with a Laughing Girl
Johannes Vermeer
269 USD
 
The Allegory of Faith
Johannes Vermeer
322 USD
 
The Art of Painting
Johannes Vermeer
362 USD
 
The Astronomer
Johannes Vermeer
267 USD
 
The Concert
Johannes Vermeer
334 USD
 
The Geographer
Johannes Vermeer
312 USD
 
The Glass of Wine
Johannes Vermeer
311 USD
 
The Guitar Player
Johannes Vermeer
248 USD
 
The Lacemaker
Johannes Vermeer
247 USD
 
The Love Letter
Johannes Vermeer
366 USD

The Milkmaid
Johannes Vermeer
269 USD

The Music Lesson
Johannes Vermeer
332 USD

The Procuress
Johannes Vermeer
325 USD

View of Delft
Johannes Vermeer
328 USD

The Little Street
Johannes Vermeer
263 USD

Woman Holding a Balance
Johannes Vermeer
268 USD

Woman with a Pearl Necklace
Johannes Vermeer
266 USD

Young Woman Standing
at a Virginal

Johannes Vermeer
313 USD

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Johannes, Jan or Johan Vermeer (1632-1675) was a Dutch painter who specialized in domestic interior scenes of middle-class life. Vermeer was a moderately successful provincial genre painter in his lifetime. He seems never to have been particularly wealthy, leaving his wife and children in debt at his death, perhaps because he produced relatively few paintings.

Vermeer worked slowly and with great care, and frequently used very expensive pigments. He is particularly renowned for his masterly treatment and use of light in his work.

Vermeer painted mostly domestic interior scenes. "Almost all his paintings are apparently set in two smallish rooms in his house in Delft; they show the same furniture and decorations in various arrangements and they often portray the same people, mostly women."

Recognized during his lifetime in Delft and The Hague, his modest celebrity gave way to obscurity after his death; he was barely mentioned in Arnold Houbraken's major source book on 17th-century Dutch painting (Grand Theatre of Dutch Painters and Women Artists), and was thus omitted from subsequent surveys of Dutch art for nearly two centuries. In the 19th century, Vermeer was rediscovered by Gustav Friedrich Waagen and Théophile Thoré-Bürger, who published an essay attributing 66 pictures to him, although only 34 paintings are universally attributed to him today. Since that time, Vermeer's reputation has grown, and he is now acknowledged as one of the greatest painters of the Dutch Golden Age.