Claude Joseph Vernet

French, Neoclassicism, 1714-1789

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Seaport by Moonlight
Claude Joseph Vernet
501 USD



The Four Times of Day: Night
Claude Joseph Vernet
256 USD

A Calm at a Mediterranean Port
Claude Joseph Vernet
434 USD

A Storm on a Mediterranean Coast
Claude Joseph Vernet
434 USD
 
Mountain Landscape with an Approaching Storm
Claude Joseph Vernet
517 USD
 
The Shipwreck
Claude Joseph Vernet
659 USD
 
The Four Times of Day: Evening
Claude Joseph Vernet
256 USD
 
The Four Times of Day: Midday
Claude Joseph Vernet
256 USD
 
The Four Times of Day: Morning
Claude Joseph Vernet
256 USD
 
Mediterranean Harbor at Sunset with the Artist
Claude Joseph Vernet
430 USD
 
The Tivoli Cascades
Claude Joseph Vernet
418 USD
 
A Mediterranean Coastal Scene at Sunset with Fishing Figures
Claude Joseph Vernet
401 USD
  
The Entrance to a Harbor with a Ship Firing a Salute
Claude Joseph Vernet
422 USD
 
A Seaport at Sunset
Claude Joseph Vernet
552 USD
 
A River with Fishermen
Claude Joseph Vernet
315 USD
 
A Calm Sea
Claude Joseph Vernet
306 USD

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Claude-Joseph Vernet was the leading French landscape painter (with Hubert Robert) of the later 18th century. He achieved great celebrity with his topographical paintings and serene landscapes. He was also one of the century's most accomplished painters of tempests and moonlight scenes.

Vernet was born in Avignon. When only fourteen years of age he aided his father, Antoine Vernet (1689–1753), a skilled decorative painter, in the most important parts of his work. The panels of sedan chairs, however, could not satisfy his ambition, and Vernet started for Rome. The sight of the sea at Marseilles and his voyage thence to Civitavecchia (Papal States' main port on the Tyrrhenian Sea) made a deep impression on him, and immediately after his arrival he entered the studio of a marine painter, Bernardino Fergioni.

In 1734, Vernet left for Rome to study landscape designers and maritime painters, like Claude Gellee, where we find the styles and subjects of Vernets paintings.

Slowly Vernet attracted notice in the artistic milieu of Rome. With a certain conventionality in design, proper to his day, he allied the results of constant and honest observation of natural effects of atmosphere, which he rendered with unusual pictorial art. Perhaps no painter of landscapes or sea-pieces has ever made the human figure so completely a part of the scene depicted or so important a factor in his design. In this respect he was heavily influenced by Giovanni Paolo Panini, whom he probably met and worked with in Rome. Vernet's work draws on natural themes, but in a way that is neither sentimental or emotive. The overall effect of his style is wholly decorative. "Others may know better", he said, with just pride, "how to paint the sky, the earth, the ocean; no one knows better than I how to paint a picture". His style remained relatively static throughout his life. His works' attentiveness to atmospheric effects is combined with a sense of harmony that is reminiscent of Claude Lorrain.

For twenty years Vernet lived in Rome, producing views of seaports, storms, calms, moonlights, becoming especially popular with English aristocrats, many of whom were on the Grand Tour. In 1745 he married an Englishwoman whom he met in the city. In 1753 he was recalled to Paris: there, by royal command, he executed the series of the seaports of France (now in the Louvre and the Musée national de la Marine) by which he is best known. His The Port of Rochefort (1763, Musée national de la Marine) is particularly notable; in the piece Vernet is able to achieve, according to art historian Michael Levey, one of his most 'crystalline and atmospherically sensitive skies'. Vernet has attempted to bring the foreground of his work to life through painting a wide array of figures engaging in a variety of activities, endeavouring to convey a sense of the commotion and drama of France's seaports.

In 1757, he painted a series of four paintings titled Four Times of the Day depicting four times of the day. Throughout his life Vernet returned to Italian themes, as shown through one of his later works - A Seashore (National Gallery). On his return from Rome he became a member of the academy, but he had previously contributed to the exhibitions of 1746 and following years, and he continued to exhibit, with rare exceptions, down to the date of his death, which took place in his lodgings in the Louvre on the 3rd of December 1789. Amongst the very numerous engravers of his works may be specially cited Le Bas, Cochin, Basan, Duret, Flipart and Le Veau in France, and in England Vivares.

Source: Wikipedia